Jesse G. Brand, PH.D., ABPP-CN

Biography : 

Dr. Jesse Brand received a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology, with a specialization in Neuropsychology, at Fordham University in New York, NY. He completed a pre-doctoral internship in Clinical Neuropsychology at North Shore – Long Island Jewish Health System in Glen Oaks, NY, and a post-doctoral fellowship in Clinical Neuropsychology at the University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville, VA. He is a member of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, International Neuropsychological Society, National Academy of Neuropsychology, and American Psychological Association – Society of Clinical Neuropsychology.

Curriculum Vitae : 
OFFICE ADDRESS:

The Neurology Center, P.A.
5454 Wisconsin Avenue
Suite 1720
Chevy Chase, MD 20815

BUSINESS
TELEPHONE:
(301) 562-7200
CITIZENSHIP: USA
LICENSURE:

District of Columbia
Maryland

EDUCATION:  
UNDERGRADUATE

Wesleyan University
Middletown, CT 
B.A. Psychology, May 2002

MASTERS PROGRAM

Fordham University 
New York, NY 
En-route M.A., Clinical Psychology: Neuropsychology 
2005-2007

INTERNSHIP

North Shore - Long Island Jewish Health System
Glen Oaks, NY
Predoctoral Internship, Neuropsychology Track (APA Approved) 2010-2011

PH.D. PROGRAM

Fordham University
New York, NY 
Dissertation: Emotion Processing in Depressed and Anxious Epilepsy Patients  
Ph.D., Clinical Psychology: Neuropsychology (APA Approved)
2005-2011

FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM

Postdoctoral Fellowship, Clinical Neuropsychology (APA Approved) 
University of Virginia Health System
Charlottesville, VA  
Chief Fellow: 2012-2013 

PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE:

The Neurology Center, P.A.
September 2013 - present 

CLINICAL TRAINING  
     2011-2013 Postdoctoral Fellowship, Clinical Neuropsychology (APA Approved) 
Chief Fellow, 2012-2013 
University of Virginia Health System; Charlottesville, VA
    2010-2011

 

Predoctoral Clinical Psychology Intern – Neuropsychology Track 
(APA Approved) 
North Shore-Long Island Jewish Health System; Glen Oaks, NY 
Major Clinical Rotations: 
Comprehensive Epilepsy Center 
Movement Disorders Program 
     2008-2010

 

Neuropsychology Practicum Student 
Columbia University Medical Center; New York, NY
     2008-2010

 

Neuropsychological Examiner,
Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, New York University Medical Center; New York, NY
     Summer 2008

 

Neuropsychology Practicum Student 
Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, New York University Medical Center; New York, NY 
Pediatric Neuropsychology 
     2007-2008

 

Rehabilitation Psychology Practicum Student (Psychotherapy) 
Saint Vincent’s Medical Center, Rehabilitation Psychology; New York, NY 
Summer 2007 Neuropsychology Practicum Student 
Burke Rehabilitation Hospital; White Plains, NY 
     2006-2007

 

Neuropsychology Practicum Student 
Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, New York University Medical Center; New York, NY 
Adult Neuropsychology 
PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS

 

American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology 
American Psychological Association, Division 40 – Clinical Neuropsychology  
International Neuropsychological Society 
National Academy of Neuropsychology
Maryland Psychological Association
 

RESEARCH EXPERIENCE

 

2004-2005 Clinical Research Coordinator 
Comprehensive Epilepsy Center, Neurological Institute, Columbia 
Presbyterian Medical Center; New York, NY 
Supervisors: Marla Hamberger, Ph.D. 
Evan Drake, Ph.D. 

2003-2004 Research Coordinator 
Department of Neuroscience and Psychiatry, Universitá degli Studi di 
Bari; Bari, Italy 

2002 - 2003 Clinical Research Coordinator 
Neuroscience Positron Emission Tomography Laboratory, Mount Sinai 
School of Medicine; New York, NY 
Supervisor: Monte S. Buchsbaum, M.D. 
 

TEACHING EXPERIENCE

 

Neuropsychology for Non-Neuropsychologists
University of Virginia School of Medicine; Charlottesville, VA., 2013 

Policy & Practice Panel: Neuropsychology 
Georgetown University Psi Chi Honors Society; Washington, DC, 2013

Applying for Internship 
NAN Early Career Mentorship Meeting; Nashville, TN, 2013

Invited Lecture: Who Wants To Be Smarter than a Neuropsychologist? 
PVCC Middle School Summer Program; Charlottesville, VA, 2012
 

PUBLICATIONS

 

1. Powers, R.L., Russo, M., Mahon, K., Brand, J., Braga, R.J., Malhotra, A.K., Burdick, K.E. (In press). Impulsivity in bipolar disorder: Relationships with neurocognitive dysfunction and substance use history. Bipolar Disorders. 

2. Brand, J.G., Rossetti, H., & Broshek, D.K. (Manuscript Submitted). Sex-related differences in sports-related concussion.In R. Echemendia (Ed.), Oxford Handbook of Sports-Related Concussion. New York: Oxford University Press.

3. Brand, J.G., Barr, W.B., Rivera Mindt, M., Schaffer, S.G., Alper, K.R., & Devinsky, O. (2012). Emotion processing bias and age of onset in epilepsy patients with depressive symptoms. Epilepsy & Behavior, 25, 552-557.

4. Brand, J.G., Goldberg, T.E., Gunawardane, N., Gopin, C., Power, R.L., Malhotra, A.K., & Burdick, K.E. (2011). Emotional bias in unaffected siblings of patients with bipolar I disorder. Journal of Affective Disorders, 136, 1053-1058. 

5. Brand, J.G., Burton, L.A., Schaffer, S.G., Alper, K.R., Devinsky, O, & Barr, W.B. (2009). Emotional recognition in depressed epilepsy patients. Epilepsy & Behavior, 15, 333-338.

6. Buchsbaum, M.S., Haznedar, M.M., Aronowitz, J., Brickman, A.M., Newmark, R.E., Bloom, R., Brand, J., et al. (2007). FDG-PET in never-previously medicated psychotic adolescents treated with olanzapine or haloperidol. Schizophrenia Research, 94, 293-305.

7. Schneiderman, J.S., Buchsbaum, M.S., Haznedar, M.M., Hazlett, E.A., Brickman, A.M., Shihabuddin, L., Brand, J.G., et al. (2007). Diffusion tensor anisotropy in adolescents and adults. Neuropsychobiology, 55, 96-111. 

8. Brickman, A.M., Buchsbaum, M.S., Shihabuddin, L., Byne, W., Newmark, R.E., Brand J., Ahmed, S., Mitleman, S.A., & Hazlett, E.A. (2004). Thalamus size and outcome in schizophrenia. Schizophrenia Research, 71, 473-484.

9. New, A.S., Buchsbaum, M.S., Hazlett, E.A., Goodman, M., Koenigsberg, H.W., Lo, J., Iskander, L., Newmark, R., Brand, J., et al. (2004).  Fluoxetine increases relative metabolic rate in prefrontal cortex in impulsive aggression.Psychopharmacology (Berl.), 176(3-4), 451-8.